LABMED Rx for Rescued Labs
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LABMED 1998 Annual Report

A 501(c)(3) organization
PMB #166
73 White Bridge Road, Suite #103
Nashville, Tennessee 37205
fax (615)313-9242
info@labmed.org
Virtual Headquarters: www.labmed.org

Contents:
I. Mission Statement and Introduction
II. Funding Activities
III. Goals and Objectives
IV. Financial Statement
V. Directors, Officers, and Advisory Boards


I. Mission Statement and Introduction

Labrador-L Emergency Medical Assistance (LABMED) is a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit organization founded in 1996 to provide emergency monies to offset expenses incurred in the veterinary medical treatment of ill or injured Labrador Retrievers in a rescue situation. LABMED is a potential resource where funding medical treatment for an abandoned or rescued dog is unavailable or inadequate, owing to but not limited to: insufficient funds available through a local Labrador Retriever or general rescue organization for treatment of dogs, lack of a local Labrador Retriever or general rescue organization, or exhaustion of all other avenues of funding.

What is LABMED?

LABMED is an Internet based organization with international representation. By using the communication powers of the Internet, LABMED is able to intercede rapidly on the behalf of deserving Labrador Retrievers worldwide. The ultimate goal of LABMED is to help raise the quality of life and adoptability of rescued animals who are expected to regain good health and who display the positive temperament which so defines the Labrador as a breed. LABMED provides these dogs with the opportunity to lead happy, healthy lives in stable loving homes. In addition, through its efforts and the example it sets, LABMED aims to stimulate a dialogue that will educate the general public about rescue animals and rescue organizations. LABMED is an organization that is meeting its challenges head on with professionalism and enthusiasm.

1998 has been an incredible year for LABMED. It was somewhere between a "re-birth" and a "coming of age". LABMED was conceived and born out of the "Buddy" crisis. Since its birth, the organization has been confronted with rapid growth and a growing need for organization. At the end of LABMED's second year, the organization blossomed. The beginning of the year saw the development of on-line Board meetings, structured committee assignments, the beginnings of an Operations Manual, and application for 501(c)(3) status, in addition to revisions to the Mission Statement, Funding Guidelines and Bylaws. In the midst of a growing demand for LABMED funding, LABMED's Board Members began an ambitious planning process that would increase their volunteer workload enormously.

Those interns who joined the Board in mid-1998 joined an organization that had accomplished a tremendous amount in the first half of the year. This growth continues, not without some growing pains, at an incredible pace. Our fund granting activities reflect the success and necessity of our organization.


II. Funding Activities

LABMED's primary purpose is to assist in the rescue of Labradors by funding those medical costs that cannot be borne by local rescue groups or individual rescuers. LABMED started with a sad little man called Bullet, who later came to be known as Buddy. Bullet had been abused, had festering gunshot wounds and had been hit by a car. Buddy is now a happy, carefree (despite the amputation of one front leg) dog who serves as LABMED's ambassador at many Labrador Specialty shows and other events. After Buddy, other applications came in, and the number of applications has increased incredibly over the first three years of LABMED's existence.

    January,February, March 1998 - Our first quarter started with an application to help Dakota, an older dog, who was given a second chance by LABMED. Four additional applications were approved, allowing a new life for Emmy, Kahlua, Brownie and Charlie.

    April, May, June 1998 - This was a busy quarter for us, during which Sophia, Missy, Jessie, Nugget and Travis joined the ranks of LABMED's successes.

    July, August, September 1998 - Applications were approved for Charlie2, Clementine, Heidi, Higgins, Sully, Casey and Molly.

    October, November, December 1998 - Started with funding for Katie. Approval of Maura, Shadow and O'Keefe's applications rounded out our year

Not all LABMED applications are approved. LABMED is careful to screen and double check each application making sure that guidelines are met. Furthermore, LABMED's Veterinary Advisory Board is consulted where there are questions about procedures and expected outcomes. Applications for dogs that have owners cannot be approved, even though these are sometimes heartwrenching pleas. On some occasions, an application is withdrawn when other funding is found, and sometimes...

...we run into a very sad situation where the dog cannot be saved. LABMED's web page lists the successes. It also pays tribute to one for whom help came too late -- a very dear old dog named Colby. Colby was 9-years-old, diabetic and had a thyroid condition. She might have become one of LABMED's successes, except that she was also found to be heartworm positive. A preventable disease, heartworm is terribly prevalent in rescue dogs. While in many cases it is curable, Colby's otherwise poor condition and medical problems made her prognosis very poor. She joins the ranks of LABMED Dogs in our hearts, but does so from the Rainbow Bridge and serves as an ambassador by hopefully educating people about the tragedy of heartworm disease.


III. Goals and Objective

Due to continuing Public Relations efforts on the Internet and heightened awareness of LABMED in the Labrador rescue community, LABMED's caseload continues to skyrocket. By the end of 1998, LABMED has funded over 30 ill or injured Labrador Retrievers or Lab-mixes, giving them a second chance at adoption many would not have had otherwise.

Based on current trends, we anticipate that in 1999 we will fund more than twice as many dogs as we did in 1998 and 1997 combined (an increase from 20 grants to upwards of 50). This will translate to an increase of 200% or more in funds granted. This tremendous increase will most likely be a direct result of our outreach efforts. In future years, we anticipate that the need for our services will continue to grow. To meet this growing need head on we have set the following three objectives: Raise Public Awareness, Increase Revenue, and Board and Staff Development.

Objective 1: Raise Public Awareness

Although initially we communicated the availability of our services via several e-mail list-serves, we are continually thinking about how our outreach could be better. Over the course of the next few years, in addition to the Internet, we will use more conventional methods of communication (e.g., ground mail and telephone) to outreach to those individuals and organizations who may not be connected to the Internet. We will begin by targeting Labrador Retriever Rescue Organizations, then Labrador Retriever Clubs and All Breed Clubs, then animal shelters to create a world wide network of assistance.

  • Our first strategy is to increase visibility both within and outside the Labrador Retriever Community by writing articles for major dog related publications, placing advertisements in show catalogs, and distributing a LABMED newsletter.
  • Our second strategy is to expand our public service efforts. To that end, we plan to educate the public through local rescue groups, breed clubs, Vets, etc., on responsible dog ownership and establish ourselves as an educational resource and advocate for Lab rescue. Furthermore, we plan to lead the way for similar organizations in other breeds (BEAGLEMED, POOMED, LHASAMED, etc.) by developing a space on our web site dedicated to this issue and encouraging open dialog with persons interest in creating a __MED for their breed of choice.

Objective 2: Increase Revenues

In fulfillment of our mission we are dedicated to raising the funds necessary to meet the needs of the Labrador rescue community. Some of our current and future plans include increasing our direct donor base, initiate a corporate fund raising campaign, and offering a wide selection of LABMED merchandise.

  • Our first strategy is to increase our direct donor base by initiating an annual donation drive.
  • Our second strategy is broaden our business and corporate donor base by seeking out corporate donors and federal grants. In addition, we will increase the number of shared revenue partnerships with companies such as Amazon and Uncle Ham's.
  • Our third strategy is raise funds by offering a wide variety of merchandise for sale off our web site and at dog related events, and by holding an annual fund raising auction.

Objective 3: Board and Staff Development

The nature of our operation (Internet based) creates special challenges for board, staff and volunteer development. Our future plans include filling out the Board, establishing a broad volunteer base, and opening a small office.


IV. Financial Statement

 

LABMED

 
 

Unaudited Statement of Income

 
 

Year End December 31, 1998

 
           

Revenue
       
  Contributions

$ 12,149

     
  Events

6,531

     
  Merchandise

19,793

     
  Interest Income

160

     
Total Revenue  

$ 38,633

   
           

Expenses
       
  Funding

8,408

     
  Administrative

1,279

     
  Auction

470

     
  Merchandise

12,656

     
  P. O. Box

108

     
  Advertising

77

     
  Postage/shipping

2,431

     
  Supplies

1,554

     
Total Expenses  

26,983

   
Net Income  

11,650

   
           


   

LABMED

   
   

Unaudited Balance Sheet

   
   

December 31, 1997

   
                 

Assets

 

Liabilities and Fund Balances

                 
Current Assets            
  Cash  

$ 7,927

         
  Inventory  

1,399

         
                 
          Fund Balance  

9,326

Total Current Assets

9,326

         
          Total Liabilities and  
Total Assets  

$ 9,326

    Fund Balances

$ 9,326

                 


   

LABMED

   
   

Unaudited Balance Sheet

   
   

December 31, 1998

   
                 

Assets

 

Liabilities and Fund Balances

                 
Current Assets            
  Cash  

$ 18,768

         
  Inventory  

1,309

         
  Equipment  

900

         
                 
          Fund Balance  

$ 20,977

Total Current Assets

20,977

         
          Total Liabilities and  
Total Assets  

$ 20,977

    Fund Balances

$ 20,977

                 


Funding levels for dogs are expected to bring 1999 expenditures to a new high.

LABMED's policy has been to ensure that direct donations are spent on funding dogs rather than on administrative costs. LABMED's Fundraising Committee through various product sales, funds administrative costs and also generates funds to supplement aide payments.

    1996 Donation Income - $1,119
    1996 Aid Expenditures - $150

    Balance carried over to 1997 - $969

    1997 Donation Income - $4,460
    1997 Aid Expenditures - $2,869

    Balance Carried over to 1998 - $2,560

    1998 Donation Income - $12,149
    1998 Aid Expenditures - $8,408

    Balance carried over to 1999 - $6,301


V. Directors, Officers, and Advisory Boards

The LABMED Board of Directors consists of members from a wide range of backgrounds and geographical locations.

Heather Bowden is a small business owner in Texas.
Katherine C. Coy is a Graduate Student in Iowa working on a Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology.
Margie Douma manages a school food service in Oregon.
Jim Groenke is a systems engineer from California.
Deborah Hamele is a neo-natal nurse from Wisconsin.
Lori Lewis is the Financial Administrator for a humane society in Florida.
Becky A. Loyd is an artist and woodcarver living in Iowa.
Laurie McDonough is an educator in Rhode Island.
Joanna K. Norman coordinates a Science Education Outreach program at a university in Arizona.
Anne O'Mahony works at the Northern Territory University in Darwin, Australia.
Karen Reardon is the Manager of Workstation Support for the Yale University Library System in Connecticut.
L. Dianne Walsh is a technical writer for a medical software firm in Pennsylvania.
Dranda Whaley directs an Advocacy Program at the Crisis Intervention Center in Tennessee.

LABMED'S Officers

    Laurie McDonough, President 8/97-12/98
    Katherine C. Coy, President, 12/98 - 12/99
    Dranda Whaley, Secretary
    Deborah Hamele, Treasurer

LABMED's Veterinary Advisory Board

This group assists LABMED by answering technical veterinary questions about a dog's condition, treatment and prognosis. Currently the following individuals serve on this panel:

    Adrienne Hudson-Willett, DVM
    Kathy Marr
    Elizabeth Pannill, DVM


Some of Our Successes

LABMED'S successes have allowed numerous very special Labradors to move from a painful existence and certain death to the happiness that every dog deserves.

Buddy Today

Buddy


More LABMED Success Stories

Emmy - before

Emmy - after

Emmy

Emmy

Travis - before

Travis - after

Travis

Travis

Sophia - before

Sophia - after

Sophia

Sophia

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