The Second Chance Times

LABMED Logo
LABMED Quarterly News :   Volume 2, Issue 1: January, 2002

LABMED Board Members:

Deb Hamele, President

Margie Dykstra, Vice-President

Dranda Whaley, Secretary

Pat Kolb, Treasurer

Linda Bagby

Beth Bodenstein

Heather Bowden

Edith Bryan

Sue Erickson

Jim Groenke

Donna Harrison

Pat Kolb

Lori Lewis

San Mitchum

Saralyn Sharp

Andrew Sherriff

Karlene Turkington

Dianne Walsh

Dogs Funded:

1st Quarter, 2001:

Charlie3
Max2 and Molly6
Dakota3
Pepsi
Tootsie
Bert
Willy
Gus
Buck
Max3
Choco
Maddie2
Cubby2
Abbey
Teddy
Amber
Sarah Jane
Woody
Rocky
Sonny
Finnigan
Rex
Elijah
Molly7
Kodi
Zoey
Charlie4
Jumper
Jack2
Luke2

2nd Quarter, 2001:

Nuegent
Baron
Buddy10
Shelby-Daisy
Windzor
Tucker3
Jake2
Wickliffe
Murphy2
Shadow7
Conner
Justin
Lucky3
Dezi, Lucy3 and Little
Ricky
Magnum
Candy2
Shadow6
Zack2
Hershey4
Osa
Bailey5

3rd Quarter, 2001:

Teddy2

Bo
Sandy2
Bruiser
Walker
Holly
Sugar
Dusty
Dakota4
Sheba
Winnie
Brody
Madison
Prince
Charlie6
Jimmie
Mingo
JD
Frosty
Charlie5
Bear4
Leigh
Gunnar
Shadow9
Ebbie
Madison2
Jack3
Shadow10
Winnie2
Tuffy

4th Quarter, 2001:

Josh
Dixie4
Bostwick
Coal
Buddy11
Inky
Zeus2
Bea
Lily
Tika
Riley
Sunny2
Duke
Chance4
Jake6
Bentley
Tipper
Baby2
Chester
Bartlett
Freddie
Shane
Nelson
Jetta
Jan
Kali
Lexus
Mo
Samson
Precious
Bingo2
Bo2
Petey
Tanner3
Maisey
Cappy
Gabe
Brador
Dutch2
Buddy12
Cassidy
Dillon

HAPPY 2002!


Please accept our best wishes for a wonderful 2002 on behalf of the 122 rescued Labs and Lab-mixes who received a second chance in 2001, thanks to your generosity! Our record-setting year included helping 20 dogs with broken bones and 29 who were heartworm positive. Amputations, entropion surgery, bite wounds, wounds caused by neglect and abuse, tumors and parvo virus infections accounted for most of the other medical care that LABMED was asked to fund. We were able to provide over $45,000 in 2001 to help these wonderful Labs and Lab-mixes have a second chance at a happy, healthy life.

Winnie

We anticipate a busy year of fund-raising in 2002, highlighted by the long-awaited publication of the new edition of Labrador Tales. We are already planning for the 2002 Bullet's Benefit Bash - this year's auction was the biggest and most successful ever. We hope to have a new quilt project underway soon, too. We continue to fill our shopping pages with Lab-friendly goodies, and we offer many ways to honor your human and canine friends with our certificate and memorial programs. Please visit our web site for all the details - and of course to read the heart-warming success stories of the dogs we have funded at Success Stories . Stories of dogs like Tuffy and Winnie that are pictured here.

Tuffy

With the number of applications for assistance increasing dramatically each year, we know we have a lot of work ahead of us. In these uncertain times, we remain determined to provide the necessary medical care and treatment for as many Labs and Lab-mixes as we can. However, as you may know, our current levels of support have in recent times proven inadequate to fund all of the qualifying applications that we have received. Any additional financial support that you - or your family, friends, or business - can provide will help us to make sure LABMED can continue to provide the levels of assistance required by the increasing demands. Your support of LABMED in the past and in the future contributes to changing the lives of our rescued companions - for the better, and forever.

We couldn't do it without you!




LABMED Board Welcomes New Officers


Pat Kolb has been elected to the position of LABMED Treasurer. Effective immediately, all checks, bills, and other financial correspondence should be sent to:
LABMED, Inc.
c/o Pat Kolb, Treasurer
213 Jeanne Lane
Chaparral, New Mexico 88021

Pat has been an active LABMED Board Member, serving on a variety of committees as well as being the Public Relations co-chair. We wish her well in her new post!

Former Treasurer Deb Hamele will be moving on to new responsibilities as LABMED President in January, 2002. Deb has been the Treasurer since LABMED began, and we appreciate her years of hard work and dedication in this capacity. We wish her well in her new post, too!

Outgoing President Jim Groenke will remain on the Board of Directors. We would like to thank him for his unstinting service to LABMED and for his willingness to continue to provide guidance for LABMED and its mission. Margie Dykstra remains as Vice-President and Dranda Whaley as Secretary. Margie and Dranda are invaluable members of the LABMED team!

All of the LABMED Officers and Board Members are volunteers who donate many hours each week to LABMED. This means that all of the funds raised by LABMED go directly to support our mission of providing emergency medical care for rescued Labrador Retrievers. Thanks to the generosity of our many supporters, more than 300 Labs and Lab-mixes have already been given their "second chance" at a happy, healthy life. The LABMED Officers and Board Members look forward to helping LABMED contribute to many more success stories.



Getting Started: Training your Rescue Dog


by Terry Albert

Obedience training is a great way to get to know your dog and build a relationship. But "sit", "down" and "stay" are not the whole story. Even if you haven't gotten into formal training, your dog is already learning. There are plenty of things you can do to develop a well-behaved pet while you're waiting for that first night of obedience class.

Your dog starts learning the minute he walks in your door. It is important for you to set the rules, calmly and consistently. It is a matter of survival in the canine world for the dog to figure out the rules of the pack as quickly as possible. As he learns your rules of the house, he will gain confidence and settle down, happy to know who's in charge. He will begin to look to you as his leader. Take advantage of the first few weeks and head off bad habits before they're established. Charley in his crate

The biggest mistake new owners make when they adopt a new rescue dog is their perception of the word "rescue". People tend to think the dog has been abused or abandoned, and go overboard with excessive nurturing of the "poor little thing". They want to reassure the dog that he will have a good home, with plenty of food and lots of attention, and can't bear to discipline or correct him. The dog is quick to take advantage. A few weeks later, the honeymoon is over, the newness has worn off, and the dog can't firure out why all the rules have suddenly changed ("What do you mean, I can't sit on the couch?!")

John Rogerson, a canine behaviorist in England, prefers to use the word "re-homed" as opposed to "rescued". It removes the emotional assumption, most often inaccurate, that the dog has had a miserable existence until he got to your house.

You may find that your new dog is actually easier to train than a dog that has lived with you for a long time. Old Rover in the corner knows exactly what he can get away with and will resist change, while new Boomer is anxiously awaiting any signal from you.

Supervise your new dog as closely as possible during his first few weeks in your home. Now is the time to reinforce housebreaking and establish a daily routine. If he will be left alone for several hours every day, start now, even if you're just in the next room, or in the house while he's out in the back yard. He needs to learn he has to spend time without you. A dog that gets constant attention and the is suddenly left alone may bark, chew or develop other problems due to separation anxiety.

Puppy loves her crate

Crate training is one of the most important things you can do for your dog. It's his safe haven from the world. From his crate, he can get used to new sights, sounds and people without feeling pressured to react. Picture him alone in the house for the first time. The door-bell rings. Should he bark? Should he protect the house? Be frightened? Where's his new leader to tell him what to do? His anxiety could lead to destructive behavior. A crate relieves him of all that responsibility, and of the opportunity to destroy the house.

Build a good line of communication between you and your dog. Be lavish with praise, so that he KNOWS he's doing something right. Rewarded behavior increases in frequency. "Good off!" "Good sit!" "Good potty!" all signal to your dog that he has made the right choices and has pleased you. "No" tells him that he is making a wrong choice, and he will learn the difference very quickly. And yes, he will test you to see if you really mean it! Be consistent, and your reward will be a well-behaved, well-trained happy member of the family for many years to come.

Sounds simple, doesn't it? Obviously it isn't that easy, or there wouldn't be so many dogs looking for new homes. But remember, once your dog knows what you expect of him, he will try very hard to please you. Don't expect miracles overnight. It takes six weeks or more of consistent repetition for a learned behavior to become a habit, so don't give up. Good luck!

"""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""'

Terry Albert is an award-winning artist and writer. She is the illustrator of the new edition of Labrador Tales: A Celebration of America's Favorite Dog, soon to be available from LABMED. You can see Terry's lovely animal portraits and other artwork on her website: www.terryalbert.com


A FITNESS PROGRAM FOR DOG LOVERS

If you have (or can borrow) a dog, you have everything you need to get in shape now!!! The following exercises can be done anywhere, anytime.

Inner Thighs: Place the dog's favorite toy between thighs. Press tighter than the dog can pull. Do not attempt bare legged - dogs who favor shortcuts to success will just dig the toy out. You could be damaged.

Upper Body Strength: Lift the dog - off the couch, off the bed, out of the flower bed. Repeat, repeat, repeat. As the dog ages, this exercise is reversed - onto the couch, onto the bed, into the car and so on.

Balance and Coordination, Exercise 1: Remove your puppy from unsuitable tight places. If they're too small for him, they're certainly too small for you. Do it anyway!

Balance and Coordination, Exercise 2: Practice not falling when your dog bounds across the full length of the room, sails through the air, and slams both front paws into the back of your knees.

Balance and Coordination, Exercise 3: (for use with multiple dogs) Remove all dogs from lap and answer the phone before it stops ringing.

Balance and Coordination, Exercise 4: (alternate) For older dogs, attempt to cross a room without tripping over the dog. Get off your couch without crushing any part of a sleeping elderly dog.

Jim and Buddy

Upper Arms: Throw the ball. Throw the squeaky toy. Throw the Frisbee. Repeat until nauseous.

Upper Arms: (alternate) Tug the rope. Tug the pull toy. Tug the sock. Repeat until your shoulder is dislocated or the dog gives up (we all know which comes first).

Hand Coordination: Remove foreign object from dog's locked jaw. This exercise is especially popular with puppy owners. Repeat. Repeat. Repeat. Remember, this is a timed exercise. Movements must be quick and precise (think concert pianist) to prevent trips to the vet, which only offer the minimal exercise benefit of jaw firming clenches.

Calves: After the dog has worn out the rest of your body, hang a circular toy on your ankle and let the dog tug while you tug back. WARNING: This is feasible only for those with strong bones and small dogs. Have you taken your calcium supplement today?

TJ (4yrs) and Molly (4months) share a kiss

Calves: (alternate) Run after dog - pick any reason, there are plenty. Dogs of any size can be used for this exercise. Greyhounds are inadvisable.

Neck Muscles: Attempt to outmaneuver the canine tongue headed for your ear, mouth, or eyeball. This is a lifelong fitness program!

(From the Internet)




A Little Black Lab

On what is now called Labrador
With its wind swept crags and jutting jaw
When the earth was young and the sea wild,
There was created a canine child.

God took a heart that was big and bold,
and a tireless will that would not fold,
A seal-like coat painted in ink,
Two soft brown eyes, and a nose that could think.

Corky

Some salted blood and a otter's tail
and four webbed feet to fight a gale;
A sailor's friend he became
from the shores of Bristol to the Spanish Main.

He asked no more than a pat on the head,
or a kindly word and a deck for a bed.
He would always wait for a hazardous chore.
and fetch a line and swim it ashore.

Or break through ice for the hunter's delight
that they might have a wild duck slice;
or walk the streets from end to end
just to comfort a "white caned" friend.

God never made a perfect man,
nor a perfect woman, too,
but a Labrador Retriever might
his finished mold come true.

When the last geese on the horizon flee
and the distant drummer summons me-
when the sun sets slowly in the west
and the dust has settled on my chest-

When the judgement door is opened wide
and I cannot run and cannot hide;
When I have to pay my life's last tab,
pray my judge be a little black Lab.

( author unknown)

LABMED Calendar: January - March, 2002

Buddy and LABMED Booth

Buddy will be making personal apperances at the following events:

Feb 2 - 3: Nashville Dog Training Club Agility Trial, Nashville, TN

Feb 9 - 10: LRC Piedmont Specialty and 2 Obedience Trials, Charlotte, NC

Mar 2 - 3: Hoosier LRC Specialty, Layafette, IN

Mar 30 - 31: Raleigh/Durham LRC Specialty, Youngsville, NC

Stop by and give him a cookie!

LABMED thanks Cookin' Campers for their very generous donation of a 10 x 10 Quik Shade canopy.

RECIPE CORNER

BRUNO'S FAVORITE TUNA BISCUITS

(Bruno is an 'honorary Lab'. He is a rescue, owned and loved by LABMED board member, Beth Bodenstein. He has an ILP number as a Flat-Coat Retriever and hopes to compete in Agility someday)

Bruno's Favorites
1 C yellow cornmeal 1 C oatmeal
1/4 tsp baking powder 1/2 tsp garlic powder
1 can (6 oz.) tuna in oil - undrained
1/3 C water

Grind oatmeal in food processor til a coarse flour, put in separate bowl. To processor, add tuna with the oil and the water. Process until pureed, then add all the rest of the ingredients. Pulse til the mixture forms a ball, then pulse to knead for 2-3 minutes. Turn out onto floured board (cornmeal can be used to flour the board), knead if necessary to soften dough, then roll out to 1/8"-1/4" thickness. Cut into desired shapes. Bake on lightly greased cookie sheet at 350 for 20-25 minutes (until hard). cool on rack.

Note: this dough can be rolled very thin and cut into tiny training biscuits, too!

Do you have a favorite recipe for dog goodies that you would like to share? Please send it to our newsletter editor Edith Bryan (bryanlabs@aol.com). Molly will taste test them and share some of her favorites in future issues of the newsletter!